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Spin BIkes

Often considered as the celebrity workout by excellence, spinning has drastically grown in popularity, especially in gyms and training bases. However, considering the ever-increasing gym fees, it may not be a bad idea to invest in your own spinning bike. Especially designed to help you meet your weight-loss goals, these machines provide a full-body workout while drawing most major muscle groups into the motions. Indeed, not unlike regular stationary bikes, spinning bikes provide quite an intense workout in the hips, thighs, calves, waist and shoulders. Moreover, these bikes have the added advantage of allowing users to stand up as they train, something that has been shown to maximize weight loss. By this token, they come with reinforced pedals that can easily sustain users of various weights and heights. Spin bikes also tend to have a more Spartan design than regular stationary ones: indeed, the seats are rarely padded because standing up is quite an important part of the routines. On the other hand, the handlebars are often textured to maximize your comfort and protect your fingers from sores and blisters. There are five core movements in the Spinning programme. Seated flat, with hands at the center part of the handlebars. This is hand position one. This position should be used only when seated, for flat road simulations and during the warm-up and cool down. Cadence between 80 and 110 RPM. Standing flat (also known as running), with hands wide on the back 12-14" part of the handlebars that crosses the rider's body. This is hand position two. Proper form for standing while running requires the body to be more upright and the back of the legs touching or enveloping the point of the saddle, with the center of gravity directly over the crank. The pressure of body weight should never rest excessively on the handlebars. Cadence is between 80 and 110 RPM Jumps, (also known as lifts), a combination of seated and standing with riders hands at position two for durations of between two and eight seconds. Cadence between 80 and 110 RPM. Seated climb with hands at position two, increased resistance and lower cadence of 60-80 RPM. Standing climb with hands wide and forward so the thumb tips are touching the far end of the handlebars (hand position three). The rider is canted slightly forward so that maximum force can be exerted onto the pedals with heavy resistance and a cadence of 60-80 RPM.

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16 Item(s)

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